Stage 1- Desired Results
Transfer:
Students will be able to independently use their learning to understand how physical and human geography can inform responsible interactions with environment.
Standards:
Content Standards:
  • CS.PreK.K.1: Identify sequential actions, such as first, next, last, in stories and use them to describe personal experiences.
  • CS.PreK.K.4: Use correctly words and phrases that indicate location and direction, such as up, down, near, far, left, right, straight, back, behind, and in front.
  • CS.PreK.K.5: Tell or show what a map is and what a globe is.

Learning Standards:
  • LS. PreK-K.2: Put events in their own and their families' lives in temporal order.
  • LS. PreK-K.3 Identify the student's street address, city or town, and Massachusetts as the state and the United States as the country in which he or she lives. Identify the name of the student's school and the city or town in which it is located.
  • LS. PreK-K.4: Describe the location and features of places in the immediate neighborhood of the student's home or school.
Essential Questions

Overarching:
  • How do people change over time?
  • Why is it important for you to know where you live?
  • Why are there different places in your neighborhood?

Topical:
  • Where do you live?
  • Where is your school?
  • What is a neighborhood?
Big Ideas
Identity

Enduring Understandings

Overarching:
  • People grow and change over time.
  • People and places have location that can be identified.
  • People need different places in their neighborhood.

Topical:
  • Homes and schools have specific addresses and locations.
  • Buildings and places around your home make up your neighborhood.
Students will know…
  • The purpose of a timeline.
  • Components of an address (street number, name, town, state, and country).
  • The name and city of their school.
  • Places in their neighborhood.
  • What a map and globe are.
Students will be skilled at …
  • Placing events in their own and families lives on a timeline.
  • Reciting their address.
  • Reciting the name of their school and the city/town of location.
  • Describing the location and features of their neighborhood.
  • Showing what a map or globe is.
Stage 2- Assessment Evidence
Performance Tasks:
Create a three part poster timeline using the words; first, next and last. You can draw, write or use photographs to illustrate a sequential event in your life. Share your timeline with the class.

Complete a "missing person/item" poster stating the missing thing, who it should be returned to, where (specific address) it should be returned to.

Create class book showing each students house and address.



Formative:
Formative assessments during the unit can include hand signals, journals, Top Down Web, Alphabox, Four Corners, Think Pair Share, Verbal Exit Ticket and KWL.

Use Google Maps to identify places in students' neighborhood (School, park, home street).

Create class map of Melrose.

Summative:
To be completed at the end of the unit: You have been learning about your neighborhood and what your address is. Write a letter to your parents with a labeled picture of a neighborhood destination you would like to walk to with them. Place the letter in an envelope, recite your address, and write it (with help). Mail it to your home.




Student Self-Assessment:
Students write their own address on sticky note to be added to blown up classroom map of Melrose with all students home address marked. (Week 4)

Students will create class book showing each students house and address.
Stage 3- Learning Plan
Week One: After reading The Little School Bus by Carol Roth, talk to students about how they get to school and what they observe on their way to school. As an opportunity to hook students, have students use Google Earth to identify where they live and see their actual homes, school, and a favorite place in the neighborhood. Create an Alphabox that includes places in their neighborhood.

Week Two: Read a piece of children's literature about getting to school. Create a three part poster timeline using the words; first, next and last. You can draw, write or use photographs to illustrate a, with help, how you get to school each morning.

Week Three: Read a piece of children's literature. Discuss with students the components of an address. Model with the address of the school. Have students remember the discussion on Google Earth about how addresses help people locate places. Take a walk in the neighborhood to identify addresses on the homes, mailboxes, and street sign. Students would also identify places in their neighborhood.

Week Four: Read Plaidypus Lost by Janet Stevens and discuss with students the location and features of places seen in the story that are also in their immediate neighborhood. Create a timeline/map of where Plaidypus was taken using the words first, next, last. Complete a "missing person/item" poster stating the missing thing, who it should be returned to, where (specific address) it should be returned to (see Plaidypus Lost pg 35).

Week Five: Read Brown Bear, Brown Bear, What do you see? by Eric Carle and create class book showing each students house and address.



Week Six: Read Miss Bindergarten Takes a Field Trip With Kindergarten by Joseph Slate. Create class map of Melrose and label the "Amazing Words" locations listen in your Reading Street Manual on page 312. Additional items to add include other places in their immediate neighborhood (i.e school).

Week Seven: Review created class map and add individual student addresses. Pose directional questions to help students determine the directions needed to get from different locations around their neighborhood using words such as up, down, near, far, left, right, straight, back, behind, and in front. (i.e. How do you get from Joe's house to Andy's house?)

Week Eight: Have students bring in a photograph of them somewhere in their immediate neighborhood and play a Where's Waldo guessing game. Students write sentence to go on back of card to be read when guessing is over. (I am at the BLANK. Use "Amazing Words" as locations).

Week Nine: Review previous formative assessments. Complete writing prompt about their favorite place in the neighborhood. ("My favorite place in Melrose is BLANK because BLANK").

Week Ten: (Summative Assessment) Write a letter to your parents with a labeled picture of a neighborhood destination you would like to walk to with them. Place the letter in an envelope, recite your address, and write it (with help). Mail it to your home.
Resources
Digital

Primary Source Documents:

City Hall

Winthrop School

Horace Mann School

Hoover School

Lincoln School

Roosevelt School

Map of Melrose


Print:

This is the way we go to school Scholastic News Non-Fictions


Media:__

Map Song

This is the way we go to school song

How Communities Grow and Change


Reading Rainbow: My America