Geography, Land, People
Stage 1- Desired Results
Transfer:
Students will be able to independently use their learning to…
1. Demonstrate independence in reading complex texts, and writing and speaking about them.
2. Build a strong base of knowledge through content rich texts.
3. Obtain, synthesize, and report findings clearly and effectively in response to task and purpose.
4. Construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others.
5. Read, write, and speak grounded in evidence.
6. Use technology and digital media strategically and capably.
7. Come to understand other perspectives and cultures through reading, listening, and collaborations.
Standards:
2.1 On a map of the world, locate all of the continents: North America, South America, Europe, Asia, Africa, Australia, and Antarctica. (G)

2.2 Locate the current boundaries of the United States, Canada, and Mexico. (G)

2.3 Locate the oceans of the world: the Arctic, Atlantic, Indian, Pacific, and Southern Oceans. (G)

2.4 Locate five major rivers in the world: the Mississippi, Amazon, Volga, Yangtze, and Nile. (G)

2.5 Locate major mountains or mountain ranges in the world such as the Andes, Alps, Himalayas, Mt. Everest, Mt. McKinley, and the Rocky Mountains. (G)

2.6 Explain the difference between a continent and a country and give examples of each. (G)

2.7 On a map of the world, locate the continent, regions, or countries from which students, their parents, guardians, grandparents, or other relatives or ancestors came. With the help of family members and the school librarian, describe traditional food, customs, sports and games, and music of the place they came from. (G, C)

ELA Standards:
CCSS.ELA- Literacy.RI.2.1 Ask and answer such questions as who, what, where, when, why, and how to demonstrate understanding of key details in a text.

CCSS.ELA- Literacy.R1.2.4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases in a text relevant to a grade 2 topic or subject area.

CCSS.ELA - Literacy W.2.2 Write informative/explanatory texts in which they introduce a topic, use facts and definitions to develop points, and provide a concluding statement or section.

CCSS.ELA- Literacy.W.2.7- Participate in shared research and writing projects(e.g., read a number of books on a single topic to produce a report; record science).
Essential Questions

Overarching:
How does geography influence people’s lives?


Topical:
What can we learn from atlases and maps?

How are continents the same and different?
Big Ideas
Our World

Enduring Understandings
Overarching:
People’s lives are affected by the geography around them.

Topical:
Maps are pictures that help us to see large places and things.

Some people make a difference in their environment.
Students will know…
  • The names of the seven continents of the world (Africa, Antarctica, Asia, Australia/Oceania, Europe, North and South America).
  • The names of the five major oceans of the world (Arctic, Atlantic, Indian, Pacific, and Southern).
  • The difference between a continent and country and examples of each.
  • The general physical characteristics of the 7 continents (mountains, major rivers, deserts, forests, and fertile areas).
  • The basic similarities and differences in the geography of the continents of North America and Africa.

Vocabulary: world, country, continent, boundaries, borders, geography

Physical Features: mountains, rivers, oceans, deserts, forests, fertile areas
Students will be skilled at …
  • Locating the seven continents on a world map.
  • Locating the five oceans on a map of the world.
  • Locating the current boundaries of the United States, Canada, and Mexico.
  • Comparing a continent and a country, and identifying on a world map two examples of each (for instance, North America and the USA, and Africa and Kenya).
  • Locating mountains, rivers, deserts, forests, and fertile areas on a map.
  • Listing basic similarities and differences in the geography of two different continents.
  • Writing informative text using unit vocabulary that identify landforms, characteristics, and location of a continent and country.
  • Identifying facts from non fiction text about a continent or country.
Stage 2- Assessment Evidence
Performance Tasks: Create a world map.
Working in teams, student ‘cartographers’ will create an accurate world map for the latest edition from a major publishing company (Atlas Publishing Co.). This map must include the seven continents, along with their general characteristics (major rivers and mountain ranges). It should also include the five oceans, and the current boundaries of the United States, Canada, and Mexico.

Student Instructions:
You are a cartographer, and have been assigned to a team of fellow cartographers to create an accurate world map for the Atlas Publishing Company.

Goal:
The goal for you is to create the most current and accurate, world map. This map should include:
  • all of the continents: North America, South America, Europe, Asia, Africa, Australia, and Antarctica
  • highlighting the current boundaries of the United States, Canada, and Mexico
  • five oceans of the world: the Arctic, Atlantic, Indian, Pacific, and Southern Oceans
  • five major rivers in the world: the Mississippi, Amazon, Volga, Yangtze, and Nile
  • major mountains or mountain ranges in the world, such as the Andes, Alps, Himalayas, Mt. Everest, Mt. McKinley, and the Rocky Mountains

Audience:
You will submit your map to the “Boss” of Atlas Publishing Co. (your teacher), and present it to your fellow students



Document Based Questions:

Summative:
  • Fill in a blank world map labeling the seven continents, oceans, major rivers, mountain ranges, and boundaries (including labeling the current borders of the United States, Canada, and Mexico).
  • Have students explain the difference between a continent and a country.
  • The performance task will serve as summative evaluation for this unit.


Student Self-Assessment: Students compare their first response to the question, "What can we learn from atlases,maps, globes, and Google Earth? in week one to their response to at the end of the unit.
Stage 3- Learning Plan
Model Curriculum Unit:


Lesson: Follow a Story on a Map

Lesson on Map and Globe:


Week One: Use Google Earth (whole group) to show students the different continents and oceans. Zoom in on continents and oceans and ask students "What do you notice?" Create an anchor chart with their responses. Students answer this question -What can we learn from atlases,maps, globes, and Google Earth? in their social studies notebook. Begin a class Alpha Box of terms.


Separate students into groups of 4. They will travel to 4 centers and explore a new resource ( map, globe. atlas, and I pads with Google Earth app)
Students will discuss what they see and write their observations in their social studies notebook.

Week Two: Identify the seven continents and oceans on the globe, Google Earth, atlas and a map. Label a map with continents and oceans.

Week Three: Show images or video clips of the physical characteristics of land (grasslands, rain forests. etc). Use A Walk in the Desert, and Rain Forests from Unit 1 Week 4 Reading Street to identify land forms. Create an anchor chart.

Week Four: Using a resource such as a map or a non fiction text, have children identify the boundaries of North America and South America, the oceans, rivers, and landforms. Use the the Geographer's Notebook page below or have students create the page in their social studies notebook. Allot 10 minutes at the end of the lesson for children to turn and talk.

Week Five: Using a resource more closely, have children identify the boundaries of Europe and Asia,
the oceans, rivers, and landforms. Use the the Geographer's Notebook page below or have students create the page in their social studies notebook. Allot 10 minutes at the end of the lesson for children to turn and talk.

Week Six: Using a resource more closely, have children identify the boundaries of Africa the oceans, rivers, and landforms. Use the the Geographer's Notebook page below or have students create the page in their social studies notebook. Allot 10 minutes at the end of the lesson for children to turn and talk.

Week Seven: Using a resource more closely, have children identify the boundaries of Asia, the oceans, rivers, and landforms. Use the the Geographer's Notebook page below or have students create the page in their social studies notebook. Allot 10 minutes at the end of the lesson for children to turn and talk.

Week Eight: Using a resource more closely, have children identify the boundaries of Australia and Antarctica, the oceans, rivers, and landforms. Use the Geographer's Notebook page below or have children create their own in their social studies notebook comparing the two continents.

Week Nine: Review the characteristics of non fiction text. Create 7 groups and assign a continent for each group to research. Assign a topic to each child. As they begin their research, each group can fill in a RAN chart (see below). Students can use the resources available and their social studies notebook to complete the "Travel the Seven Continents" graphic organizer below.



Weeks Ten and Eleven: Display National Geographic magazines and Social Studies Weekly magazines (weeks 12-14) at tables. Have children look through them and create an anchor chart with what they see (headings, diagrams, labels etc.) Students will spend the next week creating their own magazine. Each group will present their magazine at the end.

Week Twelve: Complete performance task (make maps and present).
Students answer the same question from Week 1 in their notebooks to compare their growth. As a group, have a social studies talk.

Atlas Teacher's Guide:

Activity Guide:
Resources
Digital: Continent Overview


Print:

Media: