Civics and Equality
Stage 1- Desired Results
Transfer:
Students will be able to independently use their learning to…
1. Demonstrate independence in reading complex texts, and writing and speaking about them.
2. Build a strong base of knowledge through content rich texts.
3. Obtain, synthesize, and report findings clearly and effectively in response to task and purpose.
4. Construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others.
5. Read, write, and speak grounded in evidence.
6. Use technology and digital media strategically and capably.
7. Come to understand other perspectives and cultures through reading, listening, and collaborations.
Standards:
History and Social Science
2.6 Define and give examples of some of the rights and responsibilities that students as citizens have in the school (e.g., students have the right to vote in a class election and have the responsibility to follow school rules).

2.7 Give examples of fictional characters or real people in the school or community who were good leaders and good citizens, and explain the qualities that made them admirable (e.g., honesty, dependability, modesty, trustworthiness, courage).

English Language Arts
RI 2.3 Describe the connection between a series of historical events, scientific ideas or concepts, or steps in technical procedures in a text
English Language Arts

SL 2.1 Participate in collaborative conversations with diverse partners about grade 2 topics and texts with peers and adults in small and large groups

SL 3.4 Report on a topic or text, tell a story, or recount an experience with appropriate facts and relevant, descriptive details, speaking clearly at an understandable pace

W2.8 Recall information from experiences or gather information from provided sources to answer a question.
Essential Questions

Overarching:
Why doesn’t everyone in the world have the same rights?

What makes a good leader?

Topical:
How do authors persuade?

How can children be leaders?
Big Ideas
Rights and Responsibility

Enduring Understandings

Overarching:
Not all citizens of the world have equal rights to education.

People engage in civil disobedience to promote a cause and fight for something they believe in.


Topical:
Writers give facts and reasons to persuade their audience.

Children can be leaders in their own communities.
Students will know…
  • Rights and responsibilities people have as citizens.
  • Qualities that make good leaders or citizens.
  • Examples of how others have been treated unequally.
  • Some of the ways people have achieved great distinction.
  • Leaders throughout time that have made a difference for race and gender equality.

Vocabulary: Citizen, right, leader, responsibility, characteristics, equality, inequality, gender, race, perseverance, courage, honesty, trustworthiness, modesty, dependability
Students will be skilled at …
  • Explaining some rights that people have as citizens.
  • Comparing and contrasting qualities of citizenship.
  • Explaining some ways others have been denied their rights.
  • Distinguishing between qualities that make a leader admirable.
  • Giving examples of real people who are good leaders or citizens.
  • Describing and comparing different ways people have achieved great distinction.
Stage 2-Assessment Evidence
Performance Tasks:
Writing about rights- Students will choose examples of people or groups who have been denied the right to an education and compare that to their current rights. They will express their feelings about their rights.

Students will create and produce a public service announcement to educate others on the differences of educational rights of children.

Formative: Students can write their response to the essential questions.

Summative: Performance task serves as summative.

Student Self-Assessment: Discuss how they have shown leadership. Self-asses how the school and classroom community insures that everyone has the same rights.
Stage 3- Learning Plan
Pre Assessment: RAN Chart- What do you know about rights? What do you want to know about rights?

Week One: What are rights and equality?
Students will be learning about equality focusing on gender, class and race from issues around the world
Use Social Studies Weekly 3

Week Two: Exploring the Bill of Rights
Students will be investigating Constitutional Rights
  • Task: Create a Bill of Rights for the classroom or school.
Use Social Studies Weekly 15
Week Three: Women’s Rights and Gender Equality: Elizabeth Cady Stanton
Students will learn about leaders throughout time that have made a difference for gender equality
Use Social Studies Weekly 4

Week Four: Civil Rights Movement and Racial Equality: Martin Luther King Jr.
Students will learn about leaders throughout time that have made a difference for race equality
Use Social Studies Weekly 15

Week Five: Civil Rights Movement and Racial Equality: Ruby Bridges
Students will learn about leaders throughout time that have made a difference for race equality

Week Six: Current Event on Gender Equality Issues: Nasreen
Students will learn about leaders throughout time that have made a difference for race and gender equality

Week Seven: Current Event on Class Equality Issues: Beatrice
Students will learn about leaders throughout time that have made a difference for class equality

Week Eight: Unit Assessment: Civic Rights and Responsibilities: Equality for All
Students will write response to essential questions; Does everyone in the world have the same rights? What makes a good leader?

CEPA: Writing about Rights
Students will choose examples of people or groups who have been denied the right to an education and compare that to their current rights. They will express their feelings about their rights.

CEPA: Public Service Announcement
Students will create and produce a public service announcement to educate others on the differences of educational rights of children.
Resources
Digital:

Print:

  • The Sneetches by Dr. Seuss
  • The Bill of Rights by Christine Taylor Butler
  • Elizabeth Leads the Way by Tanya Lee Stone
  • Martin’s Big Words by Doreen Rappaport
  • Martin Luther King, Jr. and the March on Washington by Frances E. Ruffin
  • Ruby Bridges Goes To School My True Story by Ruby Bridges
  • Nasreen’s Secret School: A True Story From Afghanistan by Jeanette Winter
  • Beatrice’ Goat by Page McBrier
  • Social Studies Weekly Week 3: Rules and Responsibility-Students will extend and refine their knowledge of rules and the consequences of breaking them. They will learn that people in authority have limits on their authority.
  • Social Studies Weekly Week 4: Good Citizens-Students learn some qualities of good citizens and understand the benefits and cnsequences of fulfilling their responsibilities. They will learn that privacy i a right guaranteed.
  • Social Studies Weekly Week 19: Rights and Responsibilities-Students will learn about major elected official in their community (e.g., mayor, city, commissioner). They will understand that rights and responsibilities reinforce each other and promote the common good.

Non-Fiction Short Texts:


Heifer Project International
This is the organization that helped Beatrice’s family. Information on different ways students and classes can become involved can be found on their website: heifer.org

On the heifer.org website, there are many additional teacher resources. Classes can organize fundraisers for things like “Sending a Girl to School”, providing a goat or other animals to families, clean water, trees, etc. Donation amounts are as low as $10.00. Teachers can download free materials to set up fundraisers, participate in Read to Feed (a reading incentive service-learning program), or use global education lesson plans with connections to many different curriculum areas.

ELA Extensions
BurkaAvenger.com is a video series that involves a female superhero who works to stop a school for girls in Pakistan from being closed. Her weapons are books and pens! Her message is Justice, Peace, and Education for All! This video can be used in conjunction with the lesson on Nasreen or any lesson extension on Malala. Possible ELA activities are cartoon creations with superheroes to practice using dialogue or narrative writing activities in which the students can work on fictional pieces with superhero characters that work for equality. Information on the creation of this series is readily available online on many cable news networks.

Social Justice Extension
Materials are provided below if teachers would like to involve students in a social activism activity with a petition. They can create a petition in their school for something they feel strongly about or join in with Malala’s petition drive to promote equality in education around the world. See change.org.